Monday, January 30, 2012

Why Ritalin Is Wrong

Why Ritalin Is Wrong:

800px-RitalinL. Alan Sroufe, professor emeritus of psychology at the University of Minnesota’s Institute of Child Development explains the failings of Ritalin in the New York Times:


Three million children in this country take drugs for problems in focusing. Toward the end of last year, many of their parents were deeply alarmed because there was a shortage of drugs like Ritalin and Adderall that they considered absolutely essential to their children’s functioning.


But are these drugs really helping children? Should we really keep expanding the number of prescriptions filled?


In 30 years there has been a twentyfold increase in the consumption of drugs for attention-deficit disorder.


As a psychologist who has been studying the development of troubled children for more than 40 years, I believe we should be asking why we rely so heavily on these drugs.


Attention-deficit drugs increase concentration in the short term, which is why they work so well for college students cramming for exams. But when given to children over long periods of time, they neither improve school achievement nor reduce behavior problems. The drugs can also have serious side effects, including stunting growth.


Sadly, few physicians and parents seem to be aware of what we have been learning about the lack of effectiveness of these drugs.


What gets publicized are short-term results and studies on brain differences among children. Indeed, there are a number of incontrovertible facts that seem at first glance to support medication. It is because of this partial foundation in reality that the problem with the current approach to treating children has been so difficult to see…


[continues in the New York Times]