Thursday, April 25, 2013

ACLU Uncovers Illegal Debtors’ Prisons Across Ohio

debtors' prisonACLU Uncovers Illegal Debtors’ Prisons Across Ohio:

Despite being blatantly unconstitutional, citizens are commonly being jailed for their inability to pay tickets and fines, wreaking havoc on people’s lives (and costing the state far greater sums than the unpaid tickets), ACLU Ohio reveals:
The resurgence of contemporary debtors’ prisons sits squarely at this intersection of poverty and criminal justice. In towns across the state, thousands of people face the looming specter of incarceration every day, simply because they are poor.
For Ohio’s poor and working poor, an unaffordable traffic ticket or fine is just the beginning of a protracted process that may involve contempt charges, mounting fees, arrest warrants, and even jail time. The stark reality is that, in 2013, Ohioans are being repeatedly jailed simply for being too poor to pay fines.
The U.S. Constitution, the Ohio Constitution, and Ohio Revised Code all prohibit debtors’ prisons. The law requires that, before jailing anyone for unpaid fines, courts must determine whether an individual is too poor to pay.
Despite clear constitutional and legislative prohibitions, debtors’ prison practices are alive

and well throughout Ohio. An investigation by the ACLU of Ohio uncovered conclusive evidence

of these practices in 7 of the 11 Ohio counties examined. Courts in Huron, Cuyahoga, and Erie counties are among the worst offenders. In the second half of 2012, over 20% of all bookings in the Huron County Jail were related to failure to pay fines. There is no evidence that any of these people were given hearings to determine whether or not they were financially able to pay their fines, as required by the law.
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