Thursday, June 27, 2013

Dichloroacetate: University of Alberta Doctors Discover A Cure For Cancer

Dichloroacetate: University of Alberta Doctors Discover A Cure For Cancer: Dr Evengelos Michelakis, associate chair and medical researcher at the University of Alberta’s faculty of medicine and his team of researchers have discovered a cure for cancer. Long after his work was published in the Journal of Clinical Investigation (JCI) (3)(4), Circulation (2002, 2006), Circulation Research (2004)(5), PNSAS (2007)(6)(7), and Science Translational Medicine (August 2010) (1)(2), the University of Alberta’s research team still isn’t receiving any support from the medical industry.




Dr Michelakis and his team of researchers were the first to show that a cancer marker called survivin, which was thought to be found only in cancer cells was also heavily expressed in abnormal pulmonary arteries. The work was one of the first comprehensive studies to show a link between pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) and cancer, as you can see from the sources listed above.




A portion of his work was also recently published by the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI). Dichloroacetate (DCA) was found to shrink solid tumors, including the aggressive primary brain cancer glioblastoma multiforme in human beings. You can view that study here(8).





Dr Michelakis’s research supports the emerging idea of altering the metabolism of tumors as a new direction of treatment for cancer. The drug is called dichloroacetate (DCA), and its been proven to reverse cancer growth. The drug tricks cancer cells into normal energy production by changing the ways they handle nutrient fuels. This causes the cancer cells to commit suicide without harming any healthy cells. Many researchers around the world have confirmed the research coming out of the University of Alberta.




Dichloroacetate (DCA) is a small molecule drug that has long been used to treat congenital mitochondrial abnormalities. The mitochondria (cell power source), is vital for several reasons. One of them is acting as oxygen sensors and control, as well as controlling programmed cell death. This process if known as apoptosis. The significance here is that this process is suppressed in cancer, a disease that’s characterized by uncontrolled cell growth.


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