Tuesday, June 25, 2013

Different or remarkable?

Different or remarkable?:
Differentation by marketers has a long and obvious history. When you see competition, you differentiate.
Buy mine, I can prove it is different.
They offer X, I offer Y. They cost this, I cost that.

The thing is, differentiation is selfish. It's the act of the marketer with intense interest in his segment of the market, it's inside baseball, deeply thought through reasons why someone should buy my thing instead of their thing.
Most customers, of course, don't have the same selfish view of the market, the same obsessed knowledge of features and benefits.
Differentiation is not the purple cow. This is in fact a willful misreading of what I've been writing about, usually by people who haven't read it...
Remarkable has nothing to do with the marketer. Remarkable is in the eye of the consumer, the person who 'remarks.' If people talk about what you're doing, it's remarkable, by definition.
The goal, then, isn't to draw some positioning charts and announce that you have differentiated your product. No, the opportunity is to actually create something that people choose to talk about, regardless of what the competition is doing.